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Equine Influenza

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Equine influenza is a respiratory disease of horses and other equidae that causes coughing, nasal discharge, depression, inappetance and fever of more than 38.5°C

FEB 2019 - Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) Health Update: FEI Issues Guidelines on Equine Influenza Outbreak - The FEI’s comprehensive question and answer document on equine influenza is available here. Please visit FEI Campus for a course on Equine Influenza: A Horse Owners Guide.

The nationally agreed case definition for equine influenze (EI) is:

“Equine influenza is a respiratory disease of horses and other equidae that causes coughing, nasal discharge, depression, inappetance and fever of more than 38.5°C. In a single horse, a combination of these signs constitutes a suspect case.

The disease has a high morbidity and in groups of susceptible horses, a significant proportion is likely to be very rapidly affected.

Horses that are recently recovered are unlikely to be infected but can act as mechanical carriers of the virus. Horses that have been vaccinated can be infected, and infective, excreting small amounts of virus for several days after infection, as well as mechanical carriers [shedder] of the virus, without necessarily exhibiting overt clinical signs.”

Equine Influenza is a viral respiratory disease, which is highly contagious to susceptible horses. Outbreaks of the disease are occurring with increased frequency worldwide despite the widespread use of vaccines. The disease is characterized by high morbidity (many horses will get infected), but low mortality (very few horses will actually die from the disease).

Horses that contract the disease will usually be out of training for a few weeks, but the majority recover and return to full athletic potential. The highly contagious nature of equine influenza means that if has the potential to seriously compromise national and international movement of horses. There are a number of vaccines on the market against equine influenza; most of these vaccines are combination vaccines (i.e. they also protect against tetanus, or herpes virus, etc.)

 

Last Updated ( Monday, 11 February 2019 17:03 )